Academic News, Fitness News

Treadmill test can determine mortality

Senior Man - Monitored ExerciseAnalyzing data from 58,000 heart stress tests, cardiologists from Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore report they have developed a formula that estimates one’s risk of dying over a decade based on a person’s ability to exercise on a treadmill at an increasing speed and incline.

Several exercise-based risk scoring systems already in use are designed to measure short-term risk of dying but do so strictly among patients with established heart disease or overt signs of cardiovascular trouble.

Continue reading

Standard
Fitness News, PE News

Doctors call on politicians to protect child health

Children playingChildren’s doctors are calling on the next government to put child health high on the political agenda as members of the public show overwhelming support for a series of policies which would improve children’s health.

A recent poll conducted on behalf of Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health (RCPCH) found that two thirds of Britons support banning advertising of food high in fat, sugar and salt on TV before 9pm, with 90% backing cooking and nutrition lessons in schools.

Continue reading

Standard
Academic News, Books, Fitness News

Your guide to a healthy heart

For people who have been diagnosed with a heart condition it is only natural that they are concerned about the future and seek reassurance and help after the initial treatment phase.

The authors of The Healthy Heart Book have combined their backgrounds and extensive experience in physiotherapy and nutrition to provide this comprehensive guide to achieving a full recovery.

Continue reading

Standard
Academic News, Fitness News

Coffee drinkers have ‘cleaner’ arteries

coffee1People who drink three to five cups cups of coffee a day were less likely to have early signs of heart disease according to a Korean study published in the journal Heart The findings reopen the debate about whether coffee is good for the heart.

Some studies have linked consumption to heart risk factors, such as raised cholesterol or blood pressure, while others suggest the beverage may offer some heart protection.

Continue reading

Standard
Academic News, Fitness News

Every Second Counts

Walk in the parkLow-intensity exercise like walking for a minute at a time can cut blood pressure and even housework and gardening chores can add years to your life.

Inactive people who take up low-intensity activities for a minute at a time can cut blood pressure and cholesterol while boosting their well-being.

The breakthrough comes after tests showed it is better to keep moving throughout the day rather than undertake an intense burst of exercise followed by rest.

Continue reading

Standard