Fitness News, PE News

NBA Basketball Week

The NBA has joined forces with British Basketball, the British Basketball League and England Basketball for a week of promotional activity to celebrate the sport around the country.

The UK’s first ever NBA Basketball Week will involve a series of free fan events and span across five cities between 25th February and 6th March.

The events, which are youth-oriented, will include coaching clinics, player clinics and a Sprite 3-on-3 competition.

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Fitness News, PE News

UK to host NBA game in 2010?

NBA at O2Following the third staging of an annual exhibition game at The O2 Arena, the NBA has revealed that it could stage a competitive regular-season match in London from as early as next season.

The O2 Arena in Docklands hosted a pre-season match earlier this month between Chicago Bulls and Utah Jazz and NBA chiefs want to use the venue again but this time for a competitive fixture.

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Books, PE News

Take to the court with a mental edge

The best basketball players and coaches are known not only for their success in the sport but for the manner in which they manifest their knowledge and abilities in playing, coaching and teaching the game.

Players like Michael Jordan, Steve Nash and Diana Taurasi share a special grasp of what is needed in every game situation.

Teams coached by John Wooden, Phil Jackson, Pat Summitt and Mike Krzyzewski won many championships because of their coaches’ amazing ability to teach, motivate, discipline and unite players to perform to their potential both individually and as a group. In Court Sense, John Giannini highlights the qualities that make players and teams great and provides practical ways to improve any area that might be lacking.

The first half of the book covers all the basics a player must have in place, on and off the court, in order to excel.

The second half features the six Cs that are crucial to on-court performance:

  • coachability
  • communication
  • cohesion
  • capacity to lead
  • competitiveness
  • concentration

Giannini brings a wealth of knowledge and experience to the subject as a former collegiate player and veteran coach who has earned a PhD in sport psychology. His insights and advice are combined with real-life examples and supported by stories shared by top coaches such as John Beilein, Tony Bennett, Tom Crean, Jamie Dixon, Steve Donahue, Joanne P. McCallie, Sean Miller, Oliver Purnell, Bo Ryan, Tubby Smith, Sharon Versyp and Jay Wright.

Playing like a winner first requires preparing like one. Use Court Sense to your advantage and you’ll be one step closer to cutting down the nets.

Court Sense
John Giannini
ISBN: 978 0 7360 4423 3
PRICE: £13.99 (18.20
Euros)

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PE News

UKPE News November 2008

 

Dear Colleague,

Welcome to the November issue of the UKPE newsletter!

Although the Winter is almost upon us and the weather is wet and miserable it is still a great time of the year for all manner of sporting activities, both indoors and out.

Thanks to an improvement in indoor sporting facilities over the past two decades, traditional winter sports such as football, rugby and skiing are no longer the only options available.

So when the pitches are frozen or waterlogged, why not try an alternative sport indoors?

A trawl through the Resources Section of the UKPE website reveals an enormous range of books on a wide variety of games and sports that you could introduce to your pupils.

As you are aware, not all children are keen on sport and the prospect of shivering on some windswept playing field must be a far from appealing prospect for many.

For them the intoduction of a new sport or game, where everyone starts at the same level, could be just the opportunity they need to become more actively involved.

In the UKPE Newsletter this month…
 

 

  • Product of the month…
  • The Teenage Obesity Timebomb
  • Exercise and Diet the Key to Healthy Children
  • Not every child loves sport
  • Popular Teaching Guide Goes into 3rd Edition
  • Who Says It’s Not Cricket?
  • Coaching Basketball’s winning moves
  • Dates for Your Diary
  • Product of the month…
    You can find many books that build the motor skills that children need to succeed in a variety of physical activities and sports. But not many books open their eyes to the cultures and traditions of other countries, providing them with a greater appreciation for and understanding of the world around them at the same time.International Games: Building Skills Through Multicultural Play features 65 games from 32 countries. The games build players’ physical skills while increasing their cultural awareness. They focus on the similarities between people no matter where they come from.The games make teaching simple and effective. Most require little in the way of equipment and in many cases where equipment is needed, it can be made at little cost.
    Each game

    • Is presented in an easy-to-use format
    • Includes interesting information on the origin of the game
    • Is clearly illustrated, showing pertinent parts of the game

    International Games is ideal for either a physical education class or for an interdisciplinary multicultural unit when taught in conjunction with other subjects, such as citizenship, PSHCE or geography.
    To facilitate its use as an interdisciplinary tool, the book includes end-of-unit quizzes.
    The book can be used to work progressively by skill or alternatively to teach the games on a regional basis. The book includes a game finder so you can easily find the game you want whether you teach by skill or by region.
    Activities within the book are arranged so that each one builds on skills learned in the previous one.
    However you choose to use the games in this book, International Games provides a wealth of ideas for teaching children about the world while they build their motor skills.

    Price: £10.50 (14.20 Euros)

    Read more about the book

    The Teenage Obesity Timebomb

    Fat Burger Boy



    In the past 20 years, the number of children who have a BMI of more than 30 and who are thus considered to be clinically obese has tripled. In real terms, that translates to one in ten six-year-olds and one in six 15-year-olds.

    Add in those who are overweight (with a BMI of 25 to 30) and it means that a third of British secondary school children weigh more than they should. Unsurprisingly, figures complied by the International Association for the Study of Obesity, from government and scientific studies earlier this year, showed teenagers here are among the fattest in Europe: English boys are ranked sixth, girls fourth.

    In the long-term, the obese will suffer severe ill- health, their life expectancy shortened by nine years on average.
    Today, the annual cost to the NHS of treating obesity-related illness stands at almost £3 billion. But if current trends continue, that figure will hit £50billion by the year 2050. Put simply, today’s teenagers are at a real risk of dying at a younger age than their parents.
    Given such warnings, it is hardly surprising that politicians are waking up to the scale of the problem facing Britain.

    But what about the role of the individual in all this? Surely they have a responsibility for their own health? There is a growing belief that the buck lies with them and the family unit.

    Forget the softly-softly approach currently being employed (the Department of Health recently ruled that the word obese should be avoided in its literature as it was ‘stigmatising’), some believe the time for tough talking has arrived.

    The philosophy behind this approach was highlighted recently in a speech given by Andrew Lansley, the Conservative spokesman on health.
    In it he said that excusing obesity by blaming genetics and the environment offered people too easy an excuse for their condition.

    Mr Lansley said that a secure background, loving parents, a caring family, good friends, a close community and a supportive school was key to helping youngsters with their self-esteem.

    ‘Every child needs as many of these as we can possibly give them. You can get on without one or two of these, but it’s very hard to do so without any.’

    Source: Daily Mail

     


    Exercise and Diet the Key to Healthy Children


    To add to the problem of obese teenagers, those same children face greater risks of developing type 2 diabetes, elevated cholesterol levels and heart disease. They’re also more likely to experience depression, anxiety, social isolation and decreased attendance at school.

    In order to combat this problem, many schools are turning to co-ordinated school health models to develop healthier students and that’s precisely where Physical Activity and Nutrition for Health comes in.

    This combined book and CD-ROM package will help promote fitness and nutrition among students and staff and its nutrition services tools will help garner support from parents and community members to enhance student success.

    The lessons are easy to understand and ready to go. In integrating fitness and nutrition concepts as part of a healthy lifestyle, the lessons will help students improve in all components of health-related fitness from the outset, while establishing healthy behaviours for the rest of their lives.

    Physical Activity and Nutrition for Health will help you plan and implement physical education and nutrition education programmes that significantly improve health and reinforce standards in health, physical education, mathematics and science.

    PRICE: £21.00 (28.35 Euros)


    Not every child loves sport


    Andy Burnham, the Culture Secretary, has recently joined Gordon Brown in calling for more competitive school sports, and pledged to spend £3m on promoting inter-school leagues. But these ministers are pushing on an open door.

    School team sports have been growing in popularity for a while now, and we are a long way from the days when even egg-and-spoon races were banned lest any child should feel a loser. More than four million pupils now play competitive school sport, and schools routinely offer a wide choice of games and activities.

    However, school sports policies, like most things in education, swing too wildly from one pole to another. With the Olympics coming up, the emphasis is all on the confidence and fitness that playing to win tends to encourage.

    But schools must also remember those – very many – pupils who actually hate team games. If charging up and down a netball court or hockey pitch is not something a child is good at, it is vital that they and others like them, are encouraged to exercise through more appealing programmes of dance, aerobics, circuits or even just plain power-walking.

    Competitive team sports can build a powerful school ethos that is great for those on the inside, but needs careful management if it is not to tip over into an elitist PE culture. As games teachers can all too easily become caught up in this themselves, it is something that a school’s head teacher needs to keep an eye on and that parents should speak up about if they see it developing.
    Source: The Independent


    Popular Teaching Guide Goes into 3rd Edition


    In this fully updated edition, George Graham, PhD, presents a concise, practical, user-friendly view of what it takes to become a teacher of children’s physical education.
    The book is contemporary and easy to apply in real-world teaching situations.

    Dr. Graham knows children – and certainly knows the challenges of teaching them.

    Teaching Children Physical Education, Third Edition, is valuable to both aspiring and veteran teachers alike.
    All readers will learn the skills and techniques that successful teachers use to make their classes vibrant, fun and developmentally appropriate.

     

    The author, a university professor and school PE instructor, deftly weaves research-based information with first hand experience in a conversational tone.
    The result is an easy-to-read book rich with practical advice based on what really works in today’s gymnasiums and
    playgrounds.

    Bound into every copy of the book is a DVD featuring video clips showing teachers in real-life situations as well as easy-to-print worksheets from the book. The video clips illustrate key techniques and strategies from the book.
    Those techniques and strategies include how to:

    • Motivate children to practice
    • Build positive feelings
    • Minimize off-task behaviour and discipline problems
    • Create an atmosphere of learning
    • Maximize learning
    • Develop lesson content
    • Use a problem-solving approach
    • Observe and analyse
    • Provide feedback
    • Assess children’s and your own progress
    Supplementary Instructional Materials
    This new edition is also backed by easily downloadable ancillaries for course instructors, including an instructor guide and test and presentation packages.
    All ancillaries will be FREE to course adopters and can be found at: http://www.humankinetics.com/T eachingChildrenPhysicalEducation/

    Price: £27.50 (37.15 Euros)


    Who Says It’s Not Cricket?

    Cricket


    The Phrase “It’s not cricket” is reverberating again around state school classrooms. Good old-fashioned cricketing values have prompted an improvement in behaviour in schools, according to the evaluation of a project to promote the sport in schools.

    The “Chance to Shine” scheme, designed to promote cricket in state schools by sending in club coaches to teach the game, has had a spin off beyond PE lessons.

    According to researchers at Loughborough University, schools which have taken part in the scheme report improved behaviour in school generally as a result of participating in it.

    The organisers of “Chance to Shine” are in no doubt that the club coaches who supervise cricket sessions in state schools have instilled the traditional values of the game in the pupils.

    “With cricket there is very much a code of conduct and code of behaviour such as clapping if somebody gets a six even with the other side,” said one teacher involved in the scheme.

    “It brings in very positive conduct and a restrained way of behaving compared to other sports that are usually quite negative – such as football where the pupils get easily upset or argue over decisions. With cricket, it is very much gentlemanly conduct.”

    The evaluation also says it has helped with the integration of different ethnic groups whose first language is not English.

    “A lot of our children have academic difficulties and we do find in sporting activities they may have a hidden talent,” one school told researchers.

    “A lot of our Bengali children may have English as an additional language but if you get them on a cricket pitch they are up there with their peers or even ahead … It gives them a sense of self worth that they are good at something which certainly helps raise their self-esteem.”

    The report says it has also helped cut truancy amongst disaffected pupils – with one school organising after-school cricket sessions for boys who had played truant in the past.

    “The teacher provided these sessions as a reward for good behaviour and attendance in school,” it says.
    At present the scheme is operating in 1,200 state schools. The Cricket Foundation, which runs the scheme, aims to extend it to 5,200 primary and 1,500 secondary schools by 2015.

    Source: The Independent

    Read the full article

    Coaching Youth Cricket
    This popular title gives you the tools you need to become a successful coach, even in your first season. This complete guide combines the basics of coaching and cricket in one concise resource. It is essential reading for non-specialists who wish to teach the fundamentals to 6- to 14-year-olds.

    Price: £9.99 (13.50 Euros)

    Read more about this book
     

    Coaching Basketball’s winning moves


    As a Basketball Coach of some experience have you ever wondered what it is that sets some professional teams and players above the rest? Have you watched how the likes of The Phoenix Suns’ Steve Nash shines in running the break, and wondered how his teammates know where to go to get open to receive his passes?
    You recognise that Orlando’s Dwight Howard is a tremendous talent in the post, but have you thought how has he improved and added new dimensions to his game?

    Or how do you think that Utah’s Deron Williams and Carlos Boozer run the screen-and-roll as smoothly as Jazz legends John Stockton and Karl Malone did years before?

    Well the answer is quite simply down to just one thing – Coaching.

    Even in a league loaded with superior athletic talent, the teaching, tactical manoeuvres, and strategies provided by NBA coaches are second to none.

    As younger, sometimes less mature and less experienced players from all over the world have entered the NBA, those coaching skills are more diverse and better honed than ever before.

    Now NBA Coaches Playbook takes you into the practice sessions and sideline huddles with detailed Xs and Os and more from the game’s best at maximizing performance on the court.

    Let the likes of Phil Jackson, Mike D’Antoni, Avery Johnson, Stan Van Gundy, George Karl, Eddie Jordan, Mike Dunleavy, Kareem Abdul-Jabbar and many other Head and Assistant Coaches provide you with new insights to benefit your own team and individual players.

    The Editor, Giorgio Gandolfi is well known throughout Europe having served as a European consultant for the NBCA and as a member of the Italian Basketball Federation Coaches Association since 1974.

    NBA Coaches Playbook is packed full of the kind of expert advice, hints and plays necessary to turn losing teams into winners and winning teams into unbeatables.

    But don’t just tale our word for it – see what the experts say about NBA Coaches Playbook

    NBA Coaches Playbook is exceptional! It covers every facet of basketball, from individual and team drills to strategy and coaching philosophy. I recommend it to basketball coaches at all levels.”
    Steve Smith
    Head Basketball Coach, Oak Hill Academy

    “The basketball knowledge and experience available in this book are outstanding! You’ll use this fundamental basketball information throughout the season, year after year.”
    Van Chancellor
    Women’s Basketball Head Coach, Louisiana State University

    “Technical instruction, practice tips, drills, offensive attacks, special plays and defensive tactics, all from great basketball minds that know what does and doesn’t work. NBA Coaches’ Playbook is a must-have in any serious coach’s library.”
    Rick Pitino
    Men’s Basketball Head Coach, University of Louisville

    Price £12.99 (17.55 Euros)

    Dates for Your Diary

    International Coaching Conference
    Expert coaches – Expert Systems
    18th – 20th November
    Twickenham Stadium, LondonAimed at coaches working at the highest level in sport and system builders, working within components of the coaching system.
    A mixture of keynote speakers and workshops, including the formation of working groups, will make up the programme with plenty of opportunities to network with international colleagues and delegates from around the UK to share best practice and inform latest thinking.Further Information

    Physical Education Conference
    Inclusion
    21st November
    Lilleshall National Sports Centre, Newport, Shropshire
    The Conference takes as its theme ‘Inclusion’ and is open to Headteachers, PE Subject Leaders and Teachers from Primary and Secondary phase schools.

    For further information contact: eileen.hail@shropshire-cc.gov.uk

    tenniscoachUK Annual Conference
    Coaching in the Era of the Modern Game
    24th – 25th November
    Bisham Abbey National Sports Centre
    The schedule for this year’s Annual Conference has a total of eight training sessions over the two days, plus keynote speaker Brett Hobden and sessions with Steve Green and Mike Walker.
    Further Information

    All prices in this email are valid until 30/04/09 and include VAT where applicable. Postage & Packing within UK – add £2.75 for first item and 75p per additional item. Rest of Europe – add £4 (6 Euros) for first item and £1.50 (2.25 Euros) for each additional item.  

     

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