AFPT Convention 2016

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Human Kinetics are pleased to be partnering with the AFPT Convention 2016. This year’s event takes place in Oslo, Norway from 26-28th August 2016.

The convention aims to provide enthusiasts of exercise, nutrition and health with a platform for learning and teaching. It hosts a number of lectures from the various different fields of expertise, with the speakers drawing on their knowledge. Continue reading “AFPT Convention 2016”

Maximal Interval Training CE Course

New continuing education course bringing a proven plan to develop power, strength and agility. It builds on concepts presented in Maximum Interval Training,  designed to help personal trainers deliver effective muscle building training programmes. There are several ready-to-use programmes targeting muscle groups for strength, endurance, agility, tactical training and conditioning, plus the tools to develop individualised programme for your clients.   REPs Points: 3 Price: £122.99 Find out more Subscribe to our newsletters Every month Human Kinetics produces three unique email Newsletters, packed with great articles, events and news, plus information on our latest resources and exclusive reader offers. They’re completely free and if … Continue reading Maximal Interval Training CE Course

Free public lecture: Learn how to apply music in exercise and sport

We’re extremely excited to announce that Dr Costas Karageorghis will deliver a free public lecture based on the content of his new book, Applying Music in Exercise and Sport.

The free event will take place in Beckenham, Kent on the evening of Wednesday 28 September. He will present theoretical principles and cutting-edge research related to music applications in the domain of exercise and sport.

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Fitness tracking bands may be undervaluing exercise levels

Increasingly popular wrist-worn fitness tracking bands may be underestimating our exercise levels by up to 40 per cent, a new study has found.

The research took place at the University of Queensland (UQ) and sought to determine the accuracy of the popular fitness monitors. PhD student, Matthew Wallen and supervisor Professor Jeff Coombes from the UQ’s School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences led the study in testing the four most common devices.

Continue reading “Fitness tracking bands may be undervaluing exercise levels”